Conditions & Procedures


hip anatomyNormal Anatomy of the Hip

The hip is one of the body’s largest joints. It is a ball-and-socket joint. The socket is formed by the acetabulum, which is part of the large pelvis bone. The ball is the femoral head, which is the upper end of the femur (thighbone).

The bone surfaces of the ball and socket are covered with articular cartilage, a smooth tissue that cushions the ends of the bones and enables them to move easily.

A thin tissue called synovial membrane surrounds the hip joint. In a healthy hip, this membrane makes a small amount of fluid that lubricates the cartilage and eliminates almost all friction during hip movement.

Bands of tissue called ligaments (the hip capsule) connect the ball to the socket and provide stability to the joint.

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Hip Conditions

Joint Replacement

Postoperative Care

Dislocation After Total Hip Replacement

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Hip Arthritis

Arthritis literally means “inflammation of a joint.” In some forms of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis, the inflammation arises because the smooth covering (articular cartilage) on the ends of bones become damaged or worn. Osteoarthritis is usually found in one, usually weightbearing, joint.

In other forms of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, the joint lining becomes inflamed as part of a disease process that affects the entire body. Some other types of arthritis are: seronegative spondyloarthropathies, crytalline deposition diseases, and septic arthritis.

Arthritis is a major cause of lost work time and serious disability for many people. Although arthritis is mainly a disease of adults, children may also have it.

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